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ROADMENDER Recommends

Chances are that one can be a bit tired of hearing about collaboration these days. The word is on everyone’s lips. And yet there’s always something new happening. New collaborative solutions spring up all the time. More surveys and research are revealing the good and the challenging sides of collaboration. Noise aside, the reality is that collaboration is a really exciting business practice. For those disposed to learning, check out the ‘embedded collaboration’ concept included in this week’s selection of recommended reading.

Sincere thanks to those who have suggested articles for this edition of Roadmender Recommends.

 

Next Generation Of Collaboration Is Embedded Collaboration

Collaboration has changed the way the world works today, both from the office and on the road. More businesses are embracing the power of transparency and sharing knowledge quickly and easily inside and outside the enterprise. With the rise of BYOD, employers are looking for a solution that fits the way their employees work. Embedded collaboration tools further streamline the world of collaborative possibility, leading the next generation of communications…READ ON

 

The Future Of Libraries Is Collaborative, Robotic, And Participatory

library

To look at the state of many libraries after the recession, facing cuts and closures and fundamental questions about “relevance,” you could be forgiven for being gloomy about their future. But gloomy is not the predominant tone of a terrific new report from Arup, the well-regarded design consultancy. It shows that some libraries, at least, are undergoing a “renaissance,” and that the future could be good for others…READ ON

 

Shifting To A Culture Of Experimentation And Collaboration

Adam Pisoni co-founded Yammer with David Sacks in 2008 and helped grow it to millions of users worldwide. He also co-founded the Responsive Organization movement seeking to describe the fundamental shifts impacting organizations in the 21st century. Just like Adam, I’m a true believer in networks and the sharing of information, so here is my conversation with him about the value of information, control, co-creation and cultures of collaboration…READ ON

 

Let Science Explain Why Your Coworkers Are Slackers

It’s the 19th century, and you are a foreman on a farm. You have two dozen strong laborers working for you, and you need some of them to grab a rope that will pull a plow. The rope is long enough for all the men to pull it. How many would you assign to the task? In 1913, Max Ringelmann, a French agricultural engineer, conducted what many believe was the first recorded social psychology experiment meant to answer this question. He carefully measured how much force people exerted when they pulled a rope alone, and when they pulled it with up to 28 other people…READ ON

 

Drew Clark: What makes Utah great? Families, inclusiveness and collaboration

I frequently travel throughout the United States on business. I’m always thankful when I fly into the Salt Lake City airport and realize I am home. Many others who live here love it. For example, at the StartFest technology conference earlier this fall in Provo, several panels probed what makes Utah so hospitable to entrepreneurship. And yet, said organizer Clint Betts: “It’s hard to put your finger on what makes Utah so unique and special.” Part of the “problem” is that right now the state has so many advantages, from the country’s most thriving economy to unparalleled venues for natural recreation…READ ON

 

Your New Idea Is Worthless Unless You Know How to Sell It

The talk in your organization focuses relentlessly on generating innovative, disruptive ideas. So why is it that when you throw out a creative idea at a team meeting, you get the death stare instead of a gold star?…READ ON

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