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ROADMENDER Recommends

Collaboration is a good thing. But it can be better when we understand its more challenging aspects. And as with all forms of business practice, it is of critical importance that collaboration be examined from a variety of angles. Recognising that collaboration is not a magic wand is vital for good business. This week’s selection of recommended reading is made up of writings that examine some of the challenges and issues associated with collaboration.

Sincere thanks to those who have suggested articles for this edition of Roadmender Recommends.

3 Signs You’re Suffering From Collaborative Burnout

Are your best employees suffering from collaborative overload? That’s the question posed by the Harvard Business Review’s latest cover story. The short answer is a resounding yes. For their research, the authors of the HBR article–Wharton’s Adam Grant and Reb Rebele and the University of Virginia’s Rob Cross–studied collaborative interactions at more than 300 organizations. Their conclusion is that the most valuable collaborators–those considered by their colleagues as the top teammates and best sources of information–also happened to have the lowest engagement and career satisfaction scores…READ ON

 

Why Teamwork And Collaboration Is Not Always The Answer

A CEO once told me that he does the job HR used to do. He said he spends most of his time with his employees building relationships with them, finding out how they are, asking what they think of the competition, what ideas they have, how they see their future, what they need to succeed in their personal development and how he can provide this and so on…READ ON

 

Collaborative Overload

Collaboration is taking over the workplace. As business becomes increasingly global and cross-functional, silos are breaking down, connectivity is increasing, and teamwork is seen as a key to organizational success. According to data we have collected over the past two decades, the time spent by managers and employees in collaborative activities has ballooned by 50% or more…READ ON

 

The Dangerous Fallout From All That Workplace Collaboration

Bad news if you think collaboration is the secret to boosting creativity and productivity at your company: The surge in collaboration is not only eating up your employees’ time, but up to 35 percent of the work done within collaborative teams comes from only 3 percent to 5 percent of the employees on the teams. And, boy, are they are getting grumpy and tired. According to an article in the Harvard Business Review by three business school professors, this not only means your people are spending entirely too much time in “collaborative” meetings, but the top…READ ON

 

Collaborative problems: We’re not all social networkers

We can stop arguing that only young people use social media: the average across all age groups is 72 percent (with 30 – 49 year olds also at 72 percent in their own right). So, not only are employees using it but so are (probably) most of your customers. It can be leveraged both ways to improve access to information, have discussions and allow for more accountability. But what about those who don’t like social media, and…READ ON

 

Why Collaboration Is Useless for Problem Solving

rowing-pano_16689Collaboration is basically the grownup word for “playing nice together.” That makes it easy to assume that more collaboration has got to be better than less. Unfortunately, collaboration doesn’t always work. Sometimes, it actually shackles your ability to solve a problem. A new study shows that when you really need to solve a tough problem, collaboration is not the answer. You–and your employees–will have better luck closing the door and duking it out on your own…READ ON

 

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