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ROADMENDER Recommends

Collaboration in 2014: 10 Predictions

Predicting the future is big business. It is also tricky.  But that doesn’t make it any less interesting or engaging.  As far as predictions in respect to collaboration go, this piece by David Coleman is definitely worth noting.  Without spoiling the pleasure of reading the full article, some of the trends outlined by David seem to touch on what could, in fact, be Collaboration 2.0.  For instance, the idea that trust does not have to be the basis of collaboration may be counterintuitive, but interestingly is also true as it indicates a higher degree of sophistication in the way we collaborate.  READ ON…

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Why Collaboration Is Crucial To Success

By looking for partnerships and collaborating externally, companies are able to innovate much more quickly and even create solutions to problems that may not be prevalent issues yet”. So argues Verizon’s executive Bob Mudge in this piece that highlights (yet again for the growing number of collaboration specialists) the critical aspect of collaboration for any enterprise that even remotely thinks about its future.  ROADMENDER has been strong in voicing the need for all sectors, from business to government, to recognise the importance of collaboration as an emergent discipline as the starting point.  Hopefully, this piece will add to that effort.  READ ON…

The Top 10 Workplace Trends For 2014

The old adage of “charity begins at home” could easily be adapted as “collaboration starts in the office”.  ROADMENDER has consistently pointed out that importance of the workplace as a major factor in developing a collaborative culture and therefore increasing the competitive edge and this cannot be overstated.  At the beginning of the new year (which seems as though it’s started in sprint mode) we share this piece by Dan Schawbel, a workplace expert and the New York Times bestselling author of Promote Yourself, published in Forbes magazine.  Some of the key trends to watch out for in respect to collaboration are the increasing demand for provision of wellness programs in the workplace, the rise of freelancing as a career choice and the importance of personal reputation.  READ ON…

The Degree Is Doomed

If that doesn’t sound like an alarming headline, then I don’t know what does.  It’s like a perfectly drafted slogan for disruptive innovators.  I suspect that to those who pay even scant attention to higher education, the idea that the degree is doomed may not be so out there.  In fact many have already seen evidence of this trend being embraced by many start-ups who simply believe that “credentials are so 20th century”.  Michael Station, writing for Harvard Business Review, explains what is behind this thinking.  Note the vibrant discussion in the comments section too.  READ ON…

Collaboration Wanted; Employee Buy-In Required

Many times in the past I have remarked that collaboration is not meant to be easy.  In fact if it is easy, then chances are that collaborating partners are only skimming the surface.  This is not to say that collaboration is restrictive because of its complex demands, however in some cases the discord between business leaders (owners, senior managers etc) and staff can be a significant barrier.  Many business leaders see the value of increasing collaboration, but the buy-in from staff, especially in the area of communication, can be a real challenge.  Jason Parry digs deeper into the subject in this really cool piece.  It is certainly worth noting as it explains some of the ways of better integrating collaborative technology into any enterprise.   READ ON…

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